Posts Tagged 'development'

Microcontroller Modules

This article is about is packaging a microcontroller project, and why it’s such a struggle to get something that looks halfway presentable. You can buy cheap, well-made PCBs and components from a multitude of sources, but when it comes to putting it all into a box (or on a panel, or wherever), things can get ugly. Literally. Even if the project does turn out nicely, there’s a lot of work involved getting it there. There has to be a better way.

Continue reading ‘Microcontroller Modules’

Frustrating Development Tools

I have a complaint (well, to be honest, I have a lot, but I don’t trot them out all at the same time): Why do hardware and development tools vendors insist on using things like Windows .net? It annoys me to no end to have to resort to reading through KB articles from Microsoft just to get something as straightforward as a compiler up and running. It annoys me even more when I can’t get the software running even after jumping through hoops and hopping up and down on one foot while patting the top of my head. Does it really have to be this way?

Continue reading ‘Frustrating Development Tools’

Ardunio Programming: C++ and Embedded Systems

Ideally we would use assembly language to wring the last drop of performance from small microcontrollers, and at one time that really was the only way to do it. But assembly language programming is tedious and error-prone, and if I never have to wrestle with another assembly language program that would be fine with me.

With the advent of C, things got a lot easier in the embedded systems world. As its creators stated, C is essentially a close relative of an assembler, rather like a macro assembler (there’s a good Google/Wikipedia topic, if you don’t know what a macro assembler is). A C program can be compiled into very tight and efficient code, with an almost one-to-one correspondence to the underlying assembly language that the compiler generates.

But times change, and things are extended, improved, and expanded, and thus C++ arose from C. Over time C++ has become one of the dominant languages in programming, but there are challenges when attempting to use it with a microcontroller. Continue reading ‘Ardunio Programming: C++ and Embedded Systems’

Maps and Plans

Every journey goes more smoothly with a map of some sort. Whether it’s a trip to Antarctica or developing firmware for a new microcontroller-based device, it helps to know where you’re going. Without a clear definition of the destination it’s tough to know when you’ve actually arrived. It is also helpful to know what it is, exactly, you expect to find when you do finally arrive. Continue reading ‘Maps and Plans’

Why Software Matters

Software matters because without it a computer-controlled instrument, device, or system is just a collection of plastic, metal, and silicon. It does nothing.

Without software an interferometer is just a bunch of mirrors and lenses. Without software a CCD or CMOS image sensor is just a slab of inert silicon. Without software a deep space probe is a piece of very expensive metal sculpture. Without software data collection and analysis becomes an exercise in jotting numbers in a notebook, pushing a slide rule to get approximate numerical results, and dealing with errors. Lots of errors.

Good software is not trivial, nor is it easy. It is not the simple exercises encountered in undergraduate courses, nor is it the hacked logic and unreadable gibberish generated by overcaffeinated graduate students late at night. Good software is the result of applied discipline, resulting in the creation of an abstract logical construct that is coherent, readable, elegant, and reusable. Good software is beautiful.

Continue reading ‘Why Software Matters’

Some more reasons why Software Engineering is so damned important

This is a slightly altered version of the summary of a report I wrote for a company that attempted to explain to them why they should have a software engineer (a real one) on their staff, and why it would help their bottom line.

Reviewing and working with most legacy software typically leads to an observation that is hard to avoid: Software engineering is arguably the most important aspect of any software implementation activity.

Continue reading ‘Some more reasons why Software Engineering is so damned important’

Microsoft’s Dirty C++ Trick

If you’ve worked with Visual Studio lately you’ve no doubt seen the warning about a standard POSIX system call (strcmp(), etc.) being “deprecated”.

Based on what I’ve been able to discover in various QA forums and discussions around the ‘net, it appears the MS is basically trying to discourage people from writing cross-platform code, and doing it in a most disingenuous way.

Continue reading ‘Microsoft’s Dirty C++ Trick’


Follow Crankycode on WordPress.com

Little Buddy

An awesome little friend

Jordi the Sheltie passed away in 2008 at the ripe old age of 14. He was the most awesome dog I've ever known.