Posts Tagged 'programming'

Why open source software (FOSS) struggles for acceptance

I like open source stuff, for a variety of reasons. I like the philosophy behind it, and I like the idea of many eyes and many hands working together to create better things. While I do understand that there are situations where open source is not appropriate, such as with the proprietary things I work on in my day job, I also believe that there are many cases where open source is not only appropriate, but necessary.

Software is a case in point for open source. With open source software there is less likelihood that someone will slip a nefarious backdoor into an application, and the overall “attack surface” (as the security folks call it) is much smaller than with closed applications. Free open-source software (FOSS) also has the benefit of multiple eyes reviewing it, finding bugs, suggesting (or creating) improvements, and serving as inspiration for other projects. But there are two problems with open-source software that I believe will be fatal in the long run: The documentation sucks, and the attitude of some of the people who write FOSS does nothing to help the cause. I believe that these two things are closely related.

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Ardunio Programming: C++ and Embedded Systems

Ideally we would use assembly language to wring the last drop of performance from small microcontrollers, and at one time that really was the only way to do it. But assembly language programming is tedious and error-prone, and if I never have to wrestle with another assembly language program that would be fine with me.

With the advent of C, things got a lot easier in the embedded systems world. As its creators stated, C is essentially a close relative of an assembler, rather like a macro assembler (there’s a good Google/Wikipedia topic, if you don’t know what a macro assembler is). A C program can be compiled into very tight and efficient code, with an almost one-to-one correspondence to the underlying assembly language that the compiler generates.

But times change, and things are extended, improved, and expanded, and thus C++ arose from C. Over time C++ has become one of the dominant languages in programming, but there are challenges when attempting to use it with a microcontroller. Continue reading ‘Ardunio Programming: C++ and Embedded Systems’

Fear of the Unknown

Humans are strange creatures. In general we like things to be nice and predictable; the same tomorrow as today, and the same as yesterday. I don’t have any hard data to reference, but I suspect that, overall, the human race is rather conservative. We don’t like new things that challenge our current beliefs and knowledge. This is ironic, considering that we now live in a time where change is about the only reliable constant, and new things are appearing at an astounding pace. Continue reading ‘Fear of the Unknown’

Determining Python program behavior based on available imports

Python’s import statement is an executable statement like any other. This means it can be used to determine if a particular external module is available. If a module is not available for import, the program can either modify its behavior accordingly, or shut down in a graceful fashion. Continue reading ‘Determining Python program behavior based on available imports’

Why Software Matters

Software matters because without it a computer-controlled instrument, device, or system is just a collection of plastic, metal, and silicon. It does nothing.

Without software an interferometer is just a bunch of mirrors and lenses. Without software a CCD or CMOS image sensor is just a slab of inert silicon. Without software a deep space probe is a piece of very expensive metal sculpture. Without software data collection and analysis becomes an exercise in jotting numbers in a notebook, pushing a slide rule to get approximate numerical results, and dealing with errors. Lots of errors.

Good software is not trivial, nor is it easy. It is not the simple exercises encountered in undergraduate courses, nor is it the hacked logic and unreadable gibberish generated by overcaffeinated graduate students late at night. Good software is the result of applied discipline, resulting in the creation of an abstract logical construct that is coherent, readable, elegant, and reusable. Good software is beautiful.

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Dealing With Arrogant Passive-Agressive Programmers

I don’t know what it is about programming and software engineering, but these two fields seem to attract a significant number of people with some serious personality issues.

One of the types I’ve encountered on a regular basis is what I call the APAP, or Arrogant Passive-Agressive Programmer. These are the people who will go in and rewrite existing code just to show off how clever they think they are, but can’t be bothered to document what they did or why. Heaven forbid that they should go and actually talk to the original author of the code before making changes to it. Another variation on this is the person who won’t talk directly to the person originally responsible for the design or the initial code, but instead go to the group manager, or someone not even directly associated, and discuss issues and changes with them instead.
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Wrestling with Visual Studio

A few months ago I had a relatively large C++ source code set for a suite of applications dropped into my lap. Well, that’s OK, I don’t mind C++, but what I did mind was that it was all written using Visual Studio.

It’s been a long time since I had to work with Windows code, and now that I’ve waded through line after line of code and  wrestled with Visual Studio along the way, I’ve recalled now why I don’t like working with Windows.

Continue reading ‘Wrestling with Visual Studio’


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Little Buddy

An awesome little friend

Jordi the Sheltie passed away in 2008 at the ripe old age of 14. He was the most awesome dog I've ever known.